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Study

Study Name: Fecal microbial communities from human and mice from various locations

Projects

Biosamples

Organisms

Biosamples: 48 Seq. Projects: 48
STUDY INFORMATION
GOLD Study ID Gs0153902
Study Name Fecal microbial communities from human and mice from various locations
Other Names
NCBI Umbrella Bioproject Name
NCBI Umbrella Bioproject ID
SRA Studies
SRA Study Id ERP010250  (Link to NCBI )
Study Title Regulators of Gut Motility Revealed by a Gnotobiotic Model of Diet-Microbiome Interactions Related to Travel
Study Abstract To understand how different diets, the consumers’ gut microbiota, and the enteric nervous system (ENS) interact to regulate gut motility, we developed a gnotobiotic mouse model that mimics short-term dietary changes that happen when humans are traveling to places with different culinary traditions. Studying animals transplanted with the microbiota from humans representing each cuisine and fed a sequence of diets representing those of all donors, we find that correlations between bacterial species abundances and transit times are diet dependent. However, the levels of unconjugated bile acids — reflecting microbial bile salt hydrolase activity — correlate with faster transit across diets, including a Bangladeshi diet. Mice harboring a consortium of sequenced bacterial strains from the Bangladeshi donor’s microbiota and fed a Bangladeshi diet revealed that the commonly used spice, turmeric, slows transit times. Turmeric affects gut motility via bacterial bile acid deconjugation and modulation of Ret signaling in the ENS. These results demonstrate how a single food ingredient interacts with a functional microbiota trait to regulate host physiology.
  
Legacy ER Study ID
Legacy GOLD ID
Added By JGI automated process on 2021-03-18
Last Modified By Supratim Mukherjee on 2021-03-19
PI
Description The goal of this study is to understand how different diets, the consumers’ gut microbiota, and the enteric nervous system (ENS) interact to regulate gut motility.
Relevance
Study Information Link
Study Information Visibility Public
Metagenomic Study Yes
Publication
Is GEBA
Is HMP
ECOSYSTEM CLASSIFICATION
Ecosystem Host-associated
Ecosystem Category Human
Ecosystem Type Digestive system
Ecosystem Subtype Large intestine
Specific Ecosystem Fecal
STUDY COMPOSITION
Number of Biosamples 48
Number of Organisms 0
Number of Seq Projects 48
Number of Analysis Projects 0
Number of Related Studies 0

 

 

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